while A growing share of American adults are religiously unaffiliatedthere is one belief that appears to unite an important part of them: astrology. YouGov’s latest survey It found that slightly more than a quarter of Americans (27%) – including 37% of adults under 30 – say they believe in astrology, or that the positions of the stars and planets influence people’s lives. It affects About half of Americans (51%) say they do not believe in astrology and 22% are unsure.

Young American adults say they believe in astrology more than older Americans. While 37 percent of adults under 30 say they believe it, less than half of Americans 65 and older say they do (16 percent). Women (30%) are slightly more likely to say they believe in astrology than men (25%). White Americans (25%) are slightly less likely to say that the stars and planets predict behavior than black (31%) and Hispanic (32%) Americans.

Among Americans with a high school degree or less, 29 percent say they believe in astrology, the same share as Americans with only a college degree (28 percent). People with advanced degrees (24%) are somewhat less likely to say they believe that. Americans living in the Northeast (32%) and West (29%) are somewhat more likely to express a belief in astrology than those in the South and Midwest.

Of the religious groups examined, Catholics (31%), agnostics (30%), and people with no particular religion (28%) were the most likely to say they believed in astrology, while Protestants (22 %) and Jewish Americans (22%) are somewhat less likely to believe. Of all the demographic groups we looked at, atheists are the least likely to say they believe the stars and planets have influence (only 10% say they believe this).

We also find that the gender gap flattens with age: men under 45 are slightly more likely to believe in astrology than older women (38% vs. 32%), while Older women are more confident than older men. . Women between the ages of 45 and 64 are twice as likely as their male counterparts to say they believe (29% vs. 15%), and women 65 and older are twice as likely. They say they are the same age as men. group (23% vs. 9%).

When asked if they know what their astrological sign is and given 12 signs as options, 90 percent of Americans choose one of them, while 10 percent say they’re not sure. No matter what their sign is. Although adults under the age of 30 are more likely to say they believe in astrology, people in this age group are also less likely to say they know their astrological sign – 82% say That they know their sign, compared to 94% of people 45 years and older. Women (92%) are more likely than men (87%) to know their sign and Democrats (95%) are more likely than Republicans (86%) to know.

While millions of Americans are self-professed believers in astrology, how open are Americans to voting for a political candidate who is a believer? More often than not, people say that knowing that a politician has a lot of faith in astrology won’t make any difference to them (40% say this). Only 7% say that this knowledge will make them more likely To vote for the candidate, while 34% say it will make them Less likely to vote for the candidate.

Among people who believe in astrology, an equal share say that a politician who believes in it a lot is more (21%) or less (22%) likely to vote for them. Almost half (46%) say it won’t make a difference. More than half (54 percent) of people who don’t believe in astrology say that a candidate who believes in it will make them less likely to vote (only 2 percent say it will make them more likely to vote). and 34 percent say it won’t matter). Republicans (48%) are more likely than Democrats (35%) to say that a candidate’s belief in astrology makes them less inclined to vote for them, while Democrats are more likely than Republicans to say say it won’t make a difference (43% vs. 35%).

See the above lines and crosstabs from this opinion:

method: This Daily Agenda survey was conducted by YouGov using a nationally representative sample of 3,472 US adults interviewed online on April 21, 22, 2022. Samples were weighted based on representativeness of the US population, sex, age, race, education, US. Census area, and political party.

Image: Getty



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